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September 11, 2014

Without proper preparation, having a dog can take a significant toll on hardwood floors. Fortunately, there are several effective tactics hardwood-floor-loving dog owners can use to protect their flooring investment with a pooch on the loose.

1. Select a Durable Species of Wood

Since there are many species of wood, inquire about which species are most durable and best for dogs. Experts may recommend harder woods like Brazilian Teak, Brazilian Walnut, Acacia, and Hickory. These woods are ¾” thick, which makes them sturdier than other woods.

Another solution is choosing a low gloss laminate floor since they are often highly scratch resistant. Look for “3” on the AC rating before purchasing this type of floor with a dog.

2. Keep Their Nails Clipped

Minimize risk of scratching the floor by keep your dog’s nails short. A vet will quickly show you the best techniques for accomplishing this task efficiently without hurting your dog. Another solution is buying dog boots or vinyl nail caps to minimize scratching.

3. Keep Food and Water Away from the Floor

Whether you place the bowls on a tray or use a raised holder, find a way to keep them from sitting directly on the hardwood floors. Regular water spills eventually cause warping on the hardwood, which makes for a costly repair. 

4. Keep Sweeping

Take time daily to sweep the hardwood surface to get rid of the dirt and grime brought inside by the dog. When these materials are left on the floor, they create tiny scratches on the surface when people walk back and forth across the particles.

5. Keep the Right Cleaning Supplies

Potty training is the most important part of having a dog, regardless of what type of flooring is in the house. However, it is especially important with hardwood floors. The uric acid and ammonia found in pet urine can damage the finish of hardwood and create permanent dark spots on the floor. Avoid cleaning with any products featuring ammonia, since this smell will attract the dog back to the same place regularly, increasing the damage to the finish each time.

While there are several options, the best cleaning solution to avoid this type of damage is a simple combination of water and plain vinegar. Use a damp rag and spot clean the area as quickly as possible. To avoid this problem while you’re away, consider crating the dog or hiring someone to pay regular visits during the day.

Almost 50% of households in America have dogs, and while not all of them come inside, it’s wise to know how to treat your flooring to protect it from a dog. The myth that hardwood floors and dogs don’t mix should be debunked – the two can cohabitate peacefully when owners take the necessary steps to protect their floor from the dog. 

The team at Rite Rug Flooring can provide additional advice about how to keep floors looking pristine with a dog running back and forth. With a wide variety of hardwood flooring options, we help each customer locate the best option for their lifestyle.

 

To get advice from the experts about the perfect flooring for your canine friend, contact Rite Rug today!

 

Photo Credit

 

Posted by: Rite Rug Blog Administrator

Without proper preparation, having a dog can take a significant toll on hardwood floors. Fortunately, there are several effective tactics hardwood-floor-loving dog owners can use to protect their flooring investment with a pooch on the loose.

1. Select a Durable Species of Wood

Since there are many species of wood, inquire about which species are most durable and best for dogs. Experts may recommend harder woods like Brazilian Teak, Brazilian Walnut, Acacia, and Hickory. These woods are ¾” thick, which makes them sturdier than other woods.

Another solution is choosing a low gloss laminate floor since they are often highly scratch resistant. Look for “3” on the AC rating before purchasing this type of floor with a dog.

2. Keep Their Nails Clipped

Minimize risk of scratching the floor by keep your dog’s nails short. A vet will quickly show you the best techniques for accomplishing this task efficiently without hurting your dog. Another solution is buying dog boots or vinyl nail caps to minimize scratching.

3. Keep Food and Water Away from the Floor

Whether you place the bowls on a tray or use a raised holder, find a way to keep them from sitting directly on the hardwood floors. Regular water spills eventually cause warping on the hardwood, which makes for a costly repair. 

4. Keep Sweeping

Take time daily to sweep the hardwood surface to get rid of the dirt and grime brought inside by the dog. When these materials are left on the floor, they create tiny scratches on the surface when people walk back and forth across the particles.

5. Keep the Right Cleaning Supplies

Potty training is the most important part of having a dog, regardless of what type of flooring is in the house. However, it is especially important with hardwood floors. The uric acid and ammonia found in pet urine can damage the finish of hardwood and create permanent dark spots on the floor. Avoid cleaning with any products featuring ammonia, since this smell will attract the dog back to the same place regularly, increasing the damage to the finish each time.

While there are several options, the best cleaning solution to avoid this type of damage is a simple combination of water and plain vinegar. Use a damp rag and spot clean the area as quickly as possible. To avoid this problem while you’re away, consider crating the dog or hiring someone to pay regular visits during the day.

Almost 50% of households in America have dogs, and while not all of them come inside, it’s wise to know how to treat your flooring to protect it from a dog. The myth that hardwood floors and dogs don’t mix should be debunked – the two can cohabitate peacefully when owners take the necessary steps to protect their floor from the dog. 

The team at Rite Rug Flooring can provide additional advice about how to keep floors looking pristine with a dog running back and forth. With a wide variety of hardwood flooring options, we help each customer locate the best option for their lifestyle.

 

To get advice from the experts about the perfect flooring for your canine friend, contact Rite Rug today!

 

Photo Credit

 

July 29, 2014

Selecting hardwood floors for your home is a smart choice for many different reasons. Not only does it make your home look good, it also adds value. But do you really know what you’re looking for when shopping around? What do all the ratings and grades mean? Here is a brief explanation for hardness ratings and other grades associated with hardwood flooring.

 

The Janka Hardness Scale

 

The Janka hardness scale measures the force necessary to embed a .444-inch steel ball in wood. It is expressed in pounds-force (Ibf) and is the industry standard for quality of hardwood flooring in homes and buildings. It essentially measures how well flooring holds up to standard wear and tear, as well as the level of effort required to cut, nail, and install the flooring.

While each individual piece of wood can vary in level of strength, the Janka test is based on averages for each species tested. One of the lowest rated hardwoods is Eastern White Pine at only 300 Ibf. Commonly used North American Cherry comes in at 950 Ibf, while top quality hardwood like Brazilian Walnut hovers around 3680 Ibf.

 

Your Wood Is Not Bulletproof

 

While you may want to invest in Brazilian Walnut to avoid scratches, dents, and dings, make sure you understand the true nature of wood. While harder products are more resistant to damaging, they will still scratch, dent, and ding. You should only buy what you are willing to take care of, and your hardwoods will only look as good as the care you put into them.

It’s possible to put 5 year old Brazilian Walnut floors next to 30 year old standard oak floors and have trouble deciding which looks better. It’s all in the care and treatment.

 

Which Hardwood to Choose?

When looking for hardwood flooring, don’t put all your stock in someone else’s opinion. You need to think for yourself and make an educated decision based on your lifestyle and preferences. Yes, go with something you think looks good, but also go with something you will be able to properly care for.

Do you have kids or dogs? Do you plan on having kids or dogs in the future? Both are valid questions, because your floors will be around for the long-term. The presence of kids and pets means an increased likelihood of dents and scratches. Keep this in mind.

 

Soft vs Hard

 

While it may seem like harder is better, softer can sometimes be an option. Soft wood can be hardened with the application of polyurethane finishes and costs less. Also, hard wood is often hard to saw, drill, and nail. This requires additional labor time and more money. Keep all these things in mind when making a decision.

 

Rite Rug

At Rite Rug, we have provided the latest styles and floor types to our customers since 1934. We provide the best in value, selection, quality, customer service, and installation. Whether you are looking for carpet or hardwood floors, let one of our experienced team members assist you in your search for answers. Contact us today for more information!

 

 

Check out Rite Rug Reviews.

Posted by: Rite Rug Blog Administrator

Selecting hardwood floors for your home is a smart choice for many different reasons. Not only does it make your home look good, it also adds value. But do you really know what you’re looking for when shopping around? What do all the ratings and grades mean? Here is a brief explanation for hardness ratings and other grades associated with hardwood flooring.

 

The Janka Hardness Scale

 

The Janka hardness scale measures the force necessary to embed a .444-inch steel ball in wood. It is expressed in pounds-force (Ibf) and is the industry standard for quality of hardwood flooring in homes and buildings. It essentially measures how well flooring holds up to standard wear and tear, as well as the level of effort required to cut, nail, and install the flooring.

While each individual piece of wood can vary in level of strength, the Janka test is based on averages for each species tested. One of the lowest rated hardwoods is Eastern White Pine at only 300 Ibf. Commonly used North American Cherry comes in at 950 Ibf, while top quality hardwood like Brazilian Walnut hovers around 3680 Ibf.

 

Your Wood Is Not Bulletproof

 

While you may want to invest in Brazilian Walnut to avoid scratches, dents, and dings, make sure you understand the true nature of wood. While harder products are more resistant to damaging, they will still scratch, dent, and ding. You should only buy what you are willing to take care of, and your hardwoods will only look as good as the care you put into them.

It’s possible to put 5 year old Brazilian Walnut floors next to 30 year old standard oak floors and have trouble deciding which looks better. It’s all in the care and treatment.

 

Which Hardwood to Choose?

When looking for hardwood flooring, don’t put all your stock in someone else’s opinion. You need to think for yourself and make an educated decision based on your lifestyle and preferences. Yes, go with something you think looks good, but also go with something you will be able to properly care for.

Do you have kids or dogs? Do you plan on having kids or dogs in the future? Both are valid questions, because your floors will be around for the long-term. The presence of kids and pets means an increased likelihood of dents and scratches. Keep this in mind.

 

Soft vs Hard

 

While it may seem like harder is better, softer can sometimes be an option. Soft wood can be hardened with the application of polyurethane finishes and costs less. Also, hard wood is often hard to saw, drill, and nail. This requires additional labor time and more money. Keep all these things in mind when making a decision.

 

Rite Rug

At Rite Rug, we have provided the latest styles and floor types to our customers since 1934. We provide the best in value, selection, quality, customer service, and installation. Whether you are looking for carpet or hardwood floors, let one of our experienced team members assist you in your search for answers. Contact us today for more information!

 

 

Check out Rite Rug Reviews.

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