In Home Shopping
  • carpet
  • hardwood
  • laminate
  • tile
  • vinyl

July 29, 2014

Selecting hardwood floors for your home is a smart choice for many different reasons. Not only does it make your home look good, it also adds value. But do you really know what you’re looking for when shopping around? What do all the ratings and grades mean? Here is a brief explanation for hardness ratings and other grades associated with hardwood flooring.

 

The Janka Hardness Scale

 

The Janka hardness scale measures the force necessary to embed a .444-inch steel ball in wood. It is expressed in pounds-force (Ibf) and is the industry standard for quality of hardwood flooring in homes and buildings. It essentially measures how well flooring holds up to standard wear and tear, as well as the level of effort required to cut, nail, and install the flooring.

While each individual piece of wood can vary in level of strength, the Janka test is based on averages for each species tested. One of the lowest rated hardwoods is Eastern White Pine at only 300 Ibf. Commonly used North American Cherry comes in at 950 Ibf, while top quality hardwood like Brazilian Walnut hovers around 3680 Ibf.

 

Your Wood Is Not Bulletproof

 

While you may want to invest in Brazilian Walnut to avoid scratches, dents, and dings, make sure you understand the true nature of wood. While harder products are more resistant to damaging, they will still scratch, dent, and ding. You should only buy what you are willing to take care of, and your hardwoods will only look as good as the care you put into them.

It’s possible to put 5 year old Brazilian Walnut floors next to 30 year old standard oak floors and have trouble deciding which looks better. It’s all in the care and treatment.

 

Which Hardwood to Choose?

When looking for hardwood flooring, don’t put all your stock in someone else’s opinion. You need to think for yourself and make an educated decision based on your lifestyle and preferences. Yes, go with something you think looks good, but also go with something you will be able to properly care for.

Do you have kids or dogs? Do you plan on having kids or dogs in the future? Both are valid questions, because your floors will be around for the long-term. The presence of kids and pets means an increased likelihood of dents and scratches. Keep this in mind.

 

Soft vs Hard

 

While it may seem like harder is better, softer can sometimes be an option. Soft wood can be hardened with the application of polyurethane finishes and costs less. Also, hard wood is often hard to saw, drill, and nail. This requires additional labor time and more money. Keep all these things in mind when making a decision.

 

Rite Rug

At Rite Rug, we have provided the latest styles and floor types to our customers since 1934. We provide the best in value, selection, quality, customer service, and installation. Whether you are looking for carpet or hardwood floors, let one of our experienced team members assist you in your search for answers. Contact us today for more information!

 

 

Check out Rite Rug Reviews.

Posted by: Rite Rug Blog Administrator

Selecting hardwood floors for your home is a smart choice for many different reasons. Not only does it make your home look good, it also adds value. But do you really know what you’re looking for when shopping around? What do all the ratings and grades mean? Here is a brief explanation for hardness ratings and other grades associated with hardwood flooring.

 

The Janka Hardness Scale

 

The Janka hardness scale measures the force necessary to embed a .444-inch steel ball in wood. It is expressed in pounds-force (Ibf) and is the industry standard for quality of hardwood flooring in homes and buildings. It essentially measures how well flooring holds up to standard wear and tear, as well as the level of effort required to cut, nail, and install the flooring.

While each individual piece of wood can vary in level of strength, the Janka test is based on averages for each species tested. One of the lowest rated hardwoods is Eastern White Pine at only 300 Ibf. Commonly used North American Cherry comes in at 950 Ibf, while top quality hardwood like Brazilian Walnut hovers around 3680 Ibf.

 

Your Wood Is Not Bulletproof

 

While you may want to invest in Brazilian Walnut to avoid scratches, dents, and dings, make sure you understand the true nature of wood. While harder products are more resistant to damaging, they will still scratch, dent, and ding. You should only buy what you are willing to take care of, and your hardwoods will only look as good as the care you put into them.

It’s possible to put 5 year old Brazilian Walnut floors next to 30 year old standard oak floors and have trouble deciding which looks better. It’s all in the care and treatment.

 

Which Hardwood to Choose?

When looking for hardwood flooring, don’t put all your stock in someone else’s opinion. You need to think for yourself and make an educated decision based on your lifestyle and preferences. Yes, go with something you think looks good, but also go with something you will be able to properly care for.

Do you have kids or dogs? Do you plan on having kids or dogs in the future? Both are valid questions, because your floors will be around for the long-term. The presence of kids and pets means an increased likelihood of dents and scratches. Keep this in mind.

 

Soft vs Hard

 

While it may seem like harder is better, softer can sometimes be an option. Soft wood can be hardened with the application of polyurethane finishes and costs less. Also, hard wood is often hard to saw, drill, and nail. This requires additional labor time and more money. Keep all these things in mind when making a decision.

 

Rite Rug

At Rite Rug, we have provided the latest styles and floor types to our customers since 1934. We provide the best in value, selection, quality, customer service, and installation. Whether you are looking for carpet or hardwood floors, let one of our experienced team members assist you in your search for answers. Contact us today for more information!

 

 

Check out Rite Rug Reviews.

June 13, 2014

New hardwood flooring is a sure way to add comfort and elegance to a home, while also increasing its overall value. Because there is an array of hardwood types from which to choose, it is helpful to have a basic understanding of all flooring components prior to making a final decision.

 

For example, hardwood floors are available in a variety of constructions to mitigate moisture and enable easy installation over different sub-floors. Moisture is an important issue to consider prior to installation, as it can rapidly be absorbed by and warp the wood. To err on the side of caution, consider adding a moisture barrier over the final product. Continue reading to learn about other factors worth considering.

 

Species and Color

 

Part of the selection process is identifying the preferred species of wood. This is largely a matter of personal taste and budget. Choose from domestic species, such as maple, oak, and cherry. Exotic species, such as cork, Brazilian cherry, and bamboo, are also worth considering.

 

Domestic wood can be stained to elicit a multitude of colors and shades. Exotic species, however, are usually left unstained because their natural colors are so distinct. These species are prone to photo-sensitivity and require sunlight to maintain a rich color.

 

Species and color of wood is often representative of lifestyle. For instance, dark wood is perceived as formal and upscale, while light wood tends to exude a casual atmosphere. 

 

Width and Texture

                                                                                         

The width of hardwood planks have significant impact on the appearance of a floor. The wider the planks are, the fewer seams will be visible in the floor, for example. Individuals investing in new hardwood floors may also select from different textures, such as smooth or distressed.

 

Hardness and Grade

 

The hardness of wood refers to its ability to resist indentation and damage. Different species of wood have varying degrees of hardness, so some are more susceptible to dents than others. If the new floor will be installed in a high-traffic area, hardness is a vital component to consider.

 

Grade refers to the appearance. Even if the hardwood is free from defects, appearance can vary within the same species. Some individuals prefer the visual effect of knots and streaks, while others do not.

 

These are some of the most popular selections:

 

Red oak

   This is a strong wood that is highly resistant to wear and tear.

White oak

   White oak is stronger than red oak, and is a durable option especially appropriate when both large family size and high level of activity are involved.

Birch

   Birch can range in color and is a bit softer than oak.

Maple

   Maple wood is durable, versatile and stylish. It goes well with most types of designs.

Hickory

   Hickory wood is a daring move for your flooring. It brings a rustic and distressed look to your home decor. Utilize Hickory wood for an eclectic vibe. 

 

For further consultation regarding flooring options and efficient professional installation, contact Rite Rug Flooring today.

 

 

 


Check out the Rite Rug Flooring Company History Video. 

Posted by: Rite Rug Blog Administrator

New hardwood flooring is a sure way to add comfort and elegance to a home, while also increasing its overall value. Because there is an array of hardwood types from which to choose, it is helpful to have a basic understanding of all flooring components prior to making a final decision.

 

For example, hardwood floors are available in a variety of constructions to mitigate moisture and enable easy installation over different sub-floors. Moisture is an important issue to consider prior to installation, as it can rapidly be absorbed by and warp the wood. To err on the side of caution, consider adding a moisture barrier over the final product. Continue reading to learn about other factors worth considering.

 

Species and Color

 

Part of the selection process is identifying the preferred species of wood. This is largely a matter of personal taste and budget. Choose from domestic species, such as maple, oak, and cherry. Exotic species, such as cork, Brazilian cherry, and bamboo, are also worth considering.

 

Domestic wood can be stained to elicit a multitude of colors and shades. Exotic species, however, are usually left unstained because their natural colors are so distinct. These species are prone to photo-sensitivity and require sunlight to maintain a rich color.

 

Species and color of wood is often representative of lifestyle. For instance, dark wood is perceived as formal and upscale, while light wood tends to exude a casual atmosphere. 

 

Width and Texture

                                                                                         

The width of hardwood planks have significant impact on the appearance of a floor. The wider the planks are, the fewer seams will be visible in the floor, for example. Individuals investing in new hardwood floors may also select from different textures, such as smooth or distressed.

 

Hardness and Grade

 

The hardness of wood refers to its ability to resist indentation and damage. Different species of wood have varying degrees of hardness, so some are more susceptible to dents than others. If the new floor will be installed in a high-traffic area, hardness is a vital component to consider.

 

Grade refers to the appearance. Even if the hardwood is free from defects, appearance can vary within the same species. Some individuals prefer the visual effect of knots and streaks, while others do not.

 

These are some of the most popular selections:

 

Red oak

   This is a strong wood that is highly resistant to wear and tear.

White oak

   White oak is stronger than red oak, and is a durable option especially appropriate when both large family size and high level of activity are involved.

Birch

   Birch can range in color and is a bit softer than oak.

Maple

   Maple wood is durable, versatile and stylish. It goes well with most types of designs.

Hickory

   Hickory wood is a daring move for your flooring. It brings a rustic and distressed look to your home decor. Utilize Hickory wood for an eclectic vibe. 

 

For further consultation regarding flooring options and efficient professional installation, contact Rite Rug Flooring today.

 

 

 


Check out the Rite Rug Flooring Company History Video. 

Read More From Our Blog

© 2014 RITERUG® 3949 Business Park Drive, Columbus, OH 43204 - (614) 261-6060. All Rights Reserved. - RITERUG® is a flooring company.