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February 25, 2015

Discussing trends in fashion is fleeting but very exciting. Every year designers make predictions on the next new thing seizing the market. Color forecasters are a specific subset of designer and decorator who meticulously pour over different expressions of public opinion to understand what is happening in fashion and where they think color trends are headed. Here are some predictions for 2015.

 

 

The Colors of the Recession

 

In 2008 the housing market crashed, and with it came crippling economic forces that competed with the seemingly endless overseas war to drive public morale down. Current color trends reflect our attitudes. Neutral colors like grays, browns, and pastels have triumphed for several years as homeowners sought a palette that reminded them of safety and conservative values.

Blues and reds were more prevalent at 9/11. Since red is a brighter, louder color, the sensibility and warm security of blue made it the most popular color for almost five years. Blue was slowly replaced by dark browns and grays in the late 2000's.

These colors are currently on a downward march. Brown may be the torch-bearer for most design industries (including interior design), but light browns are beginning to outpace the darker colors, and brown by volume is decreasing in overall use. Warmer browns are beginning to surface, like tans and browns shaded with orange.

Gray is still an important color, championed by the younger generation. Tan ccountertops, cabinets, and upholstery are all very popular, but these, too, are lightening in shade. Pebble and cream-colored gray shades are appearing as neutral home-sale colors, and lighter shades of furniture are hitting the markets.

 

 

What's Hot?

 

Blue is giving way to green, perhaps in part to environmental sentiment by eco-friendly buyers, or maybe due to blue's long presence on the market.  Sour greens are mixed with light blues into paisley patterns for ties, furniture, and wallpaper.  Blues everywhere have started serving as accent colors to freshen rooms to give them a clean, crisp look.

Popularity in brighter colors has started to surge.  Customers seeking reds are starting to buy deep of hot reds.  Furniture is getting bolder, and in cosmetic paint, pastel bases are making way to deep bases.  

Greater contrasts are also big.  Kitchens and bathrooms designed exclusively in black and white are easy to make pop.  Rooms decorated in black and white are popular in Europe, though over the past year or two they have migrated to the United States.  Many take the black/white combo a step further by using a shockingly bright color, like red or yellow, to punctuate the room and give it a sense of flavor. 

 

What's Not? 

 

Yellow has fallen by the wayside, expect as an accent color.  Oranges are diminishing in popularity, too.  Most oranges are seen in earthy pallets in darker, deeper shades.  These are great colors to support brown and sometimes green.  Finally, completing the rainbow, purples and violets have been out of favor for three decades.  We see no evidence that purple will make a comeback.

 

For more deign tips or floor coverings to emphasize the interior design of your home, visit a local Rite Rug Flooring store near you.  Our carpeting and other floor types can provide a great foundation for personalizing your interior style.  

 

Posted by: Rite Rug Blog Administrator

Discussing trends in fashion is fleeting but very exciting. Every year designers make predictions on the next new thing seizing the market. Color forecasters are a specific subset of designer and decorator who meticulously pour over different expressions of public opinion to understand what is happening in fashion and where they think color trends are headed. Here are some predictions for 2015.

 

 

The Colors of the Recession

 

In 2008 the housing market crashed, and with it came crippling economic forces that competed with the seemingly endless overseas war to drive public morale down. Current color trends reflect our attitudes. Neutral colors like grays, browns, and pastels have triumphed for several years as homeowners sought a palette that reminded them of safety and conservative values.

Blues and reds were more prevalent at 9/11. Since red is a brighter, louder color, the sensibility and warm security of blue made it the most popular color for almost five years. Blue was slowly replaced by dark browns and grays in the late 2000's.

These colors are currently on a downward march. Brown may be the torch-bearer for most design industries (including interior design), but light browns are beginning to outpace the darker colors, and brown by volume is decreasing in overall use. Warmer browns are beginning to surface, like tans and browns shaded with orange.

Gray is still an important color, championed by the younger generation. Tan ccountertops, cabinets, and upholstery are all very popular, but these, too, are lightening in shade. Pebble and cream-colored gray shades are appearing as neutral home-sale colors, and lighter shades of furniture are hitting the markets.

 

 

What's Hot?

 

Blue is giving way to green, perhaps in part to environmental sentiment by eco-friendly buyers, or maybe due to blue's long presence on the market.  Sour greens are mixed with light blues into paisley patterns for ties, furniture, and wallpaper.  Blues everywhere have started serving as accent colors to freshen rooms to give them a clean, crisp look.

Popularity in brighter colors has started to surge.  Customers seeking reds are starting to buy deep of hot reds.  Furniture is getting bolder, and in cosmetic paint, pastel bases are making way to deep bases.  

Greater contrasts are also big.  Kitchens and bathrooms designed exclusively in black and white are easy to make pop.  Rooms decorated in black and white are popular in Europe, though over the past year or two they have migrated to the United States.  Many take the black/white combo a step further by using a shockingly bright color, like red or yellow, to punctuate the room and give it a sense of flavor. 

 

What's Not? 

 

Yellow has fallen by the wayside, expect as an accent color.  Oranges are diminishing in popularity, too.  Most oranges are seen in earthy pallets in darker, deeper shades.  These are great colors to support brown and sometimes green.  Finally, completing the rainbow, purples and violets have been out of favor for three decades.  We see no evidence that purple will make a comeback.

 

For more deign tips or floor coverings to emphasize the interior design of your home, visit a local Rite Rug Flooring store near you.  Our carpeting and other floor types can provide a great foundation for personalizing your interior style.  

 

February 05, 2015

Winter is an optimum time to work on home renovation projects, particularly flooring renovations. Flooring provides a foundation for both your home in general and your interior design, so it’s vital your floor always be sturdy, durable, and attractive. However, even the most enduring floors eventually break down, so if you’ve lived in your home for five to ten years, it’s probably time to think about re-covering. Be sure to evaluate your floor before you begin the project, with help from professionals like us. Today, we’ll walk you through some basic floor evaluation tips.

Decide How Much Re-Covering You’ll Do

Many people decide to replace their entire floor when touch-ups could have fixed it. They end up unnecessarily wasting money replacing a floor that had more time and wear in it. To avoid this pitfall, spend time determining exactly how much replacing you’ll do. For example, you can save money on wood floors with a simple stain or refinishing job. Refinishing and varnish will particularly stand out on dark woods such as oak or cherry and give your floor a fresh new look in no time.

Diagnose the Actual Problems

Determine if your flooring issues are purely cosmetic or actual safety concerns. Cosmetic concerns such as stained tiles, dents or holes in wood floors, or buckled carpet might be fixed with a touch-up or two. Safety concerns include wobbling tiles, disintegrated carpet padding, termite and insect damage, or carpet that’s aggravating your allergies, sinuses, or existing respiratory sensitivities.

If your flooring has severe damage or is making you sick, go ahead and renovate. Consult professionals on the type of flooring you need – a homeowner with respiratory issues could benefit from switching to wood floors or from plush to Berber carpet. Consider re-grouting the floor for minor chips, holes, or wear and tear. If you discover termite or insect damage, call an exterminator immediately.

Watch Out for Asbestos

These days, we know asbestos causes cancer, respiratory issues, and other serious illnesses. Unfortunately, older homes were built during a time when asbestos use was considered normal and not many alternatives existed. If your home was built in or before the 1980s, consult a professional about asbestos levels. If high asbestos levels are discovered, do not replace the flooring yourself. A professional can do it safely to keep asbestos dust out of the air.

Decide What Flooring You Need

If you decide to renovate or re-cover your entire floor, you’ll need to make decisions about the new flooring. Different rooms are best with specific types of flooring. For instance, tile or vinyl flooring is a good choice for bathrooms and laundry rooms. They are durable and will hold up to moisture. For living spaces, choose hardwood or laminate flooring. For your bedroom, go with carpet or hardwood.

Consult the professionals on the type of flooring that best fits your lifestyle, taste and budget. Visit Rite Rug Flooring for all of your flooring needs.

 

 

Posted by: Rite Rug Blog Administrator

Winter is an optimum time to work on home renovation projects, particularly flooring renovations. Flooring provides a foundation for both your home in general and your interior design, so it’s vital your floor always be sturdy, durable, and attractive. However, even the most enduring floors eventually break down, so if you’ve lived in your home for five to ten years, it’s probably time to think about re-covering. Be sure to evaluate your floor before you begin the project, with help from professionals like us. Today, we’ll walk you through some basic floor evaluation tips.

Decide How Much Re-Covering You’ll Do

Many people decide to replace their entire floor when touch-ups could have fixed it. They end up unnecessarily wasting money replacing a floor that had more time and wear in it. To avoid this pitfall, spend time determining exactly how much replacing you’ll do. For example, you can save money on wood floors with a simple stain or refinishing job. Refinishing and varnish will particularly stand out on dark woods such as oak or cherry and give your floor a fresh new look in no time.

Diagnose the Actual Problems

Determine if your flooring issues are purely cosmetic or actual safety concerns. Cosmetic concerns such as stained tiles, dents or holes in wood floors, or buckled carpet might be fixed with a touch-up or two. Safety concerns include wobbling tiles, disintegrated carpet padding, termite and insect damage, or carpet that’s aggravating your allergies, sinuses, or existing respiratory sensitivities.

If your flooring has severe damage or is making you sick, go ahead and renovate. Consult professionals on the type of flooring you need – a homeowner with respiratory issues could benefit from switching to wood floors or from plush to Berber carpet. Consider re-grouting the floor for minor chips, holes, or wear and tear. If you discover termite or insect damage, call an exterminator immediately.

Watch Out for Asbestos

These days, we know asbestos causes cancer, respiratory issues, and other serious illnesses. Unfortunately, older homes were built during a time when asbestos use was considered normal and not many alternatives existed. If your home was built in or before the 1980s, consult a professional about asbestos levels. If high asbestos levels are discovered, do not replace the flooring yourself. A professional can do it safely to keep asbestos dust out of the air.

Decide What Flooring You Need

If you decide to renovate or re-cover your entire floor, you’ll need to make decisions about the new flooring. Different rooms are best with specific types of flooring. For instance, tile or vinyl flooring is a good choice for bathrooms and laundry rooms. They are durable and will hold up to moisture. For living spaces, choose hardwood or laminate flooring. For your bedroom, go with carpet or hardwood.

Consult the professionals on the type of flooring that best fits your lifestyle, taste and budget. Visit Rite Rug Flooring for all of your flooring needs.

 

 

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